Cats and churches

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I really should take photos in better light.  Still, you get Eloise sitting on the tortoise run, looking out at my new garden furniture in the bright sunshine.

Mike left a comment about a comment I’d left on his blog, which reminded me of one of my favourite websites.  Simon Knott, quite some years ago, started a website about Suffolk churches.  It’s entertainingly written, but there’s real research and knowledge there too.  Some years ago, he visited my village church and left a comment in the visitors’ book, thanking us for leaving the church open.  I was churchwarden at the time and excitedly left an appreciative comment on his website.  He usually arrived, in those early days anyway, on his bike and wearing casual clothes, with the result that some clergymen were a bit sniffy about him, which he also referred to entertainingly.  As the years have gone by, he’s extended his visits to Norfolk and Essex.  To give you a flavour, here is his entry on my village church.

I’ve finally admitted that I’ve given the kittens names.  I’ve stopped referring to the mother as a feral cat for a while, because I don’t believe that she started that way.  I haven’t really named her, though – that is, I call her Cat after the cat in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, though Roses calls her Mama Cass.  Because I call them barn cats, I named the two black cats Barney.  I can’t tell them apart, so there isn’t much point in giving them each a name.  In the same theme, I’ve called their sister Betty, because she’s dark haired and pretty.  The tabby cat has been called Zain, because I’d promised Ro’s friend (and Best Man) that, if I ever had a cat, I’d call it after him.  Eloise arrived already named, but the tabby is charming and friendly, so he’s worth the name.

The sun was shining brightly and they were in the shadow of the Dutch barn where I feed them, so I had to tweak the contrast quite a lot to have them show at all.  Cat was not there at the time, she arrived a minute later.  I’ll show you a picture of her another time.  She’s very like her daughter, except that she has green eyes.

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8 comments on “Cats and churches

  1. Tim

    I never got to go into your church on my sole visit (there were a few other distractions around at the time), but I remember being very struck by the exterior (and the railings, which were lovingly explained to me by Russell). I have huge admiration for people like Mr Knott, who have the energy and erudition to perform what is, probably, largely a thankless task; his description made the church come alive. If he’s still in business, can you send him to Berkshire, please?

    Reply
    1. Z Post author

      Eloise and Alex painted the railings one summer, when they were in their teens. It had been done once since, but Russell and I really wanted them done again – when he died, I asked for donations for that purpose, made up the money and they have now been done. Sadly, it was decided to add rather naff gold paint to the finials, but I’m so tolerant nowadays that I hardly even mind.

      I hope Simon will spread his good deeds throughout the country.

      Reply
    1. Z Post author

      I’m rather proud of them, I must admit. Cat’s fur was thin and moulting when I started feeding them and now all five of them look really healthy.

      Reply
    1. Z Post author

      Yes, I remember the brass rubbing days too. Churches and churchyards are brilliant – there’s a church in Norwich where there are lots of depictions of skeletons, then there are bosses and stained glass – so much of interest. And gravestones are endlessly entertaining, or poignant.

      Reply
  2. Mike and Ann Horner.

    I do like tabbies. Over the years we’ve had a good many cats, but I think our favourite was Wally, a handsome tabby who lived to be twenty three, and died about nine or ten years ago. Oddly enough, we both occasionally still see him (out of the corner of an eye) although he never lived at this address.

    Reply
    1. Z Post author

      My Chester and Tilly could still be right here with me, needs no imagination at all.

      I’m rather sold on tortoiseshells now, but the tabby kitten is a beauty. His father is a tabby, but nowhere near as attractive.

      Reply

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