Z takes pictures

I’ve just finished editing the photos for the next catalogue – I haven’t Photoshopped them or anything, just straightened and cropped them as necessary, added the lot number to each and sent Weeza 27 pictures for the catalogue; I shall let Ro have photos of all the lots on Sunday to go on the website, by which time I’ll have added the last fifteen – those pieces are being brought here tomorrow.    It is very good to have that done.  I’m pleased with them, the day was perfect for taking pictures, being quite bright but not sunny.  I prefer to do it out of doors but in a lightbox.

I can’t say that I enjoy the taking of the pictures, however.  So tedious, getting the tripod and everything just so, it takes ages to set up, although once that’s done each item doesn’t take long to photograph.  Thank goodness for digital cameras; at least I know within minutes if any of them is not good enough and can do it again.  That didn’t happen this time, thanks to the Sage watching.  He saw, as I didn’t, when a gnat flew in front of a piece of china just as I took the photo, so I was able to do it again at once.

Once we’d done the photography, we sat outside with Dilly and the children for quite some time in the sunshine.  I cuddled Hadrian, who has grown a great deal.  He is now two months old and has grown out of his little crib, so Dilly has passed it on to Weeza.  He’s also grown out of all his first clothes.  I haven’t seen him smile yet and asked if he does.  “He smiles at Al,” said Dilly.  “I don’t know what Al has that I don’t, but he can always raise a smile.”  She noticed that Hadrian was reaching out to touch the toggle on the hood of my jacket.

I must go to bed.  It’s quarter to one.  I shall backdate this to midnight as this still counts as Wednesday, to me, in the same way as I reckon it doesn’t become afternoon until I’ve had lunch.

 

6 comments on “Z takes pictures

  1. Z

    You’re right, Dave, I started by saying it was bright with no sun, then said we sat in the sunshine. The sun came out, most helpfully, just after we’d finished the photography . It was lovely for part of the afternoon.

    Reply
  2. 63mago

    When photographing objects for a museum’s inventory – it was in pred-digital times – we had to trick the camera (a semi-automatic) with a grey cardboard. A very expensive piece of cardboard, because it was of a defined colour temperature. So the camera was always adjusted and the colours came out “truely”. Today things are a bit easier, because there’s no developing of film and then making pictures on paper etc. – the backside is that digital photographs will not last for hundred years. And if colour is important … form the camera to the printing machine things need to be calibrated, and it never is. If you want a book that is still pay- and sell-able.
    Thank God for typography!

    Reply
  3. Z

    If, of course, one has lain awake for several hours, it becomes a complaint that I didn’t sleep until three in the morning, or whatever.

    I find early photographs very interesting, Mago. I don’t suppose present images will still be around in 150 years, as they are.

    Reply

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